what to plant in june

What to Plant in June: 20 Heat Loving Crops for your Garden

Ready to start vegetable gardening, but not sure what to plant in June? This Quick Guide will help you choose the right plants for your vegetable garden. 

School’s out, the hot weather is in full swing and you want to put some new plants in your garden. But what should you choose? And is it too late to even be thinking about planting this growing season? 

Not to worry! Depending on your frost dates you still have plenty of time to fill your garden beds with crops both as transplants and from seed for a great harvest (colder climates may start considering fall crops in late June). 

In this garden guide, I’ll walk you through what to plant in June and how to plant those crops for fruit production and bountiful harvests through late fall. 

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Sow seeds based on your first frost date

Before we dive into the list of things you can plant in June let’s talk about the crucial importance of the frost date for this list and any other list you may come across. 

Many beginner gardeners fall into the trap of planning the “when” of their garden based on their USDA hardiness zones. These numbers are important, but they only tell us the extreme temperatures our plants can survive. Essentially, whether or not a particular crop is perennial (or returns year after year) in your area. If you plant solely off of Hardiness Zones then you may be a zone 7 gardener who lives in NEW YORK, following the gardening plan of someone living in ALABAMA. 

That’s why it’s essential to know your specific First frost date. The Farmer’s Almanac has a handy tool where you can enter your zip code and get the estimated average frost dates for your particular location.

Additionally, I will caveat this by saying, this post is designed specifically for people who have last frost dates between the 15th of OCTOBER and the 15th of November.

If your first frost date is before this time frame, you can still peruse, but recognize you may have a shorter growing season for some of the crops I am going to mention. That’s okay, you can always try again next year!

What to plant in June

June is hot and you may find that many of your crops are starting to be affected by the heat! That’s why June is the perfect time for frost tender heat loving crops we will mention in this list! It’s also a good idea to consider second plantings of crops that have exhausted their harvests! We have divided this list of what to plant in June into 3 different categories. They are:

  • What to transplant outdoors in June
  • What to direct sow in June
  • What to start Indoors in June

Remember, these are all based on a frost date of before after October 15th.

What to direct sow in June

One of the best things about summer planting of crops is the soil temperature is warm enough so that germination happens in a couple of days! This means your plants get a quick start and can mature quite quickly! Let’s look at a few plants you can direct sow as seeds for a June planting.

Basil

Basil is a great herb that comes in a multitude of varieties! My favorite is lemon basil and holy basil! It’s also a crop that you may find you plant once and never have to intentionally plant again! Basil can be direct sowed through late June/early July for a late fall harvest.

Beans

Green beans are another crop that can be planted from early spring through midsummer! Depending on the variety you grew, you may find that you are ready to plant your second crop in early summer of late June! This is especially important for bush beans. Runner beans will typically last you through the fall. 
Some of my favorite varieties include:

Collards

Southern Collards are a great staple of the southern garden! They are also another example of a plant that thrives in hot weather conditions. Collards can be directly sown through late July for a fall harvest.

Corn

Corn is a classic summer crop and can be directly sown in June for a late summer harvest. Make sure to choose a variety that is suitable for your growing zone and check the days to maturity so you know when to expect your corn to be ready for picking. Also note, you want to grow cucumbers in blocks for adequate pollination. 

Cowpeas

Cowpeas are a legume that is grown for the dry beans! They are a southern kitchen stable and thrive in the heat!  You can direct sow them through early July and not worry about them until the plants die off. 

Cucumbers

Another heat-loving crop, cucumbers are perfect for planting in June. They grow quickly and produce abundant yields throughout the summer months. Consider trellising your cucumber plants to save space in your garden.

Okra

A southern favorite, okra loves the heat and can be planted in June for a fall harvest. Make sure to choose a variety that has shorter days to maturity if you live in a cooler climate.

Watermelons

Sweet and juicy, watermelons are another great crop for planting in June. They require warm soil temperatures to germinate so it’s best to direct sow them rather than transplanting seedlings.

Pumpkins

If you’re feeling adventurous, why not try growing pumpkins? They can be directly sown in June and will be ready just in time for Halloween. Plus, they make great fall decorations and delicious pumpkin pies!

Summer Squash

In June, the squash bugs are wreaking havoc on your crops so planting a second round of squash in June and your current plants may be dying. It’s a great choice to plant squash in June to continue your harvest through fall. 

What to transplant outdoors in June

June is also a great time for transplanting heat-loving crops that have been started indoors or in a greenhouse. Here are some options for what you can transplant into your garden beds in June.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a summer staple and can be transplanted as seedlings in late June for a late summer harvest. Make sure to choose varieties that do well in hot weather and provide adequate support for the plants as they grow.

Peppers

Like tomatoes, peppers are another warm weather crop that can be transplanted in June. Look for varieties with shorter days to maturity if you live in a cooler climate or want an earlier harvest.

Eggplant

Another heat-loving crop, eggplants can be planted throughout the summer months. If you have a short growing season, it’s important to choose varieties with faster maturity dates.

Cucumber

Cucumbers prefer to be started by seed but they can be transplanted as well! Transplanting in June could give you an additional head start as you pull your previous planting of cucumbers.

Herbs

Many herbs can be transplanted in June this includes oregano, thyme, parsley, sage and mint. Many of these (with the exception of parsley) are perennial and will thrive year after year.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a tropical crop that thrives in the heat! You’ll want to plant slips in early June so that you can harvest your sweet potato crop before the frost.

What to start indoors in June

June is a great month to start planning for your fall garden! You’ll want to know your last frost date and calculate exactly how many days you have until your frost date to determine varieties to plant and when to start them. 

For may fall planted crops, June is a bit early, but as late June approaches you can begin starting seeds! 

Remember that this list of what to plant in June is based on a First frost date after October 15th. If you have a last frost date in early October or sooner, you may want to focus on the transplant and fall planting list. 

Keep in mind that the weather is ever-changing, so it’s always a good idea to keep an eye on the forecast and adjust your planting plans accordingly. Happy gardening!  

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